Sail trim class presentations

February 11, 2015 § Leave a comment

Sail Trim Class

It’s always fun, and a sign that spring will eventually arrive, to share sail-trim concepts with the hopeful and studious folks at the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center. Here are the presentations from this year’s classes. Download and share as you wish.

Upwind Sail Trim; Mains, Jibs and Rigs

Downwind Sail Trim: Spinnakers, Speed and Polar Diagrams

And here’s the cool Wind Tunnel App that makes classroom conversation a tad more tolerable.

Let’s do this on the water when the ice breaks.

-N

Racing with Copepods: A case for creative mentoring

January 6, 2015 § Leave a comment

Barbara McVeigh was, for a time, the Communications/Outreach Director at one of the most innovative community sailing centers I’m aware of, a place call Sailing Education Adventures, in Marin, California.

We’ve been emailing back and forth for years about how SEA links sailing and experiential learning. I’ve been impressed by the organization’s fearless nature- and science-based curriculum, a distant outlier among community and sailing programs that typically focus on skills or racing.

And I was concerned to learn in early 2014 that Barbara was moving onto a new career: independent documentary filmmaking, and that her contributions at SEA were coming to an end.

Instead, Barb upped the ante. She’s challenging everyone who teaches and advocates for sailing to think much bigger.

Her short film “Racing with Copepods,” directed by Carlos Grana, and featuring Kimball Livingston as narrator, begins like any intro to a sailing program with dock talk and PFDs. But soon, the shackles binding conventional thinking come off, and we’re watching kids blast across San Francisco Bay aboard planing dinghies on a destination adventure to collect beach samples and dig in mud. Then they’re casting nets off the transom of an ocean-going research sailboat to collect and study microscopic organisms with scientists as crew-mates. Eventually, the kids explain the links between the Copepods – tiny speedy jumping swimmers – and themselves. They share the water. And the water, therefore, deserves our care.

It’s not a new story that sailing is a great platform for teaching and learning things like leadership, character and inquisitiveness. What’s new is that the connections made to and from sailing by creative mentors like Barbara are limitless. Almost anything you want to learn, you can learn through sailing. And almost anything you want to teach, you can teach through sailing. The key is to make the environment for mentoring. Then, sailing doesn’t need saving. It does the saving.

You can like Racing with Copepods on Facebook and find a viewing at http://www.racingwithcopepods.com.

Racing with Copepods screenshot

Sail trim is more than ‘sheet it’ and ‘cleat it’

May 9, 2014 § Leave a comment

Sailors make macro adjustments like changing sails or reefing when conditions warrant. However, these mega moves happen about as often as one might change from forward to reverse in a car, sometimes once or twice during a trip, rarely more. More often, sailors are “shifting gears” as if driving a manual transmission car, powering up or down to get into the right gear, and making constant fine adjustments to find the groove. How do they do it?

In this sailing ‘how-to’, I offer upwind sailtrim suggestions for the novice wanting to learn more, and for the experienced sailor looking for a refresher.  Read it in the May 2014 Learn to Sail issue of Sailing Magazine. If you want to follow along with slides, download the classroom material that the narrative is based on, here.

Upwind Sail Trim

 

SailingMag

 

 

Diversity Begins with Spirit

May 2, 2014 § Leave a comment

Seen first in Spinsheet Magazine.

———–

There has been a lot of recent chatter about creating diversity in sailing. US Sailing gave the subject top billing at their latest conference. On the surface, the theme of the year, sailing’s cause célèbre, seems to be that if America’s skin is darkening, evidenced by the last two elections and demographic trends, so too should sailing’s. This is inarguably true, but let’s not underestimate the enormity of the task ahead.

Search the words “sailing” or “yachting” on Google and often they’ll come attached to a string with words like “elite,” “club” or “exclusive”. While there are outliers among us, sailing isn’t starting from a position of authority on the subject of enthusiastically engaging people other than old white men like me to participate.

Diversity isn’t something you brand and then switch on. It’s something you are. You don’t become diverse when you market to people who are different from you and hope they show up. It’s a condition where different people agree to be together because experiences, both in lifetimes and across generations, prove that it’s worth it. It’s not a temporary meeting at a neutral safe harbor. Once it starts, it continues. Once engaged, diverse groups manage the tensions that come from mixing alternate viewpoints. It’s hard to stay together, but truly diverse groups do.

The Spirit of Bermuda, and some of its crew, shown here, tell us how. Read more here.

Diversity Begins with Spirit

 

Are sailing clubs compatible with 21st century social trends?

February 4, 2014 § 4 Comments

Adult Women Go Sailing

The fastest growing and most active group entering sailing is made up of active outdoorsy adult women. (For decades, most sailing newcomers were boys.)

But Sailing’s adult female newcomer is rightly skeptical that membership in a club is necessary to her sailing. Why fight through a thick residue of archaic attitudes when your mission is to go blast reaching with your friends and then post clips?

So like the disruptive new technology that reshaped the America’s Cup, this new demographic is shaking sailing’s traditional institutions – sailing and yacht clubs –  to their core.

Read more at Sailing Magazine.

SailingMag

Aussie sailing club shows how families can #gosailing

December 2, 2013 § 1 Comment

This is what  the Sandrigham Yacht Club – one of Australia’s largest –  is doing to promote sailing, family participation and membership. Perhaps you’ll find a nugget for your own organization. Thanks to Ross Kilborn, a great sailing friend from down-under, for sharing this video.

“What pushes middle school students…

October 30, 2013 § Leave a comment

…is the unexpected experience of someone taking them seriously.” – Paul Tough

This simple but clear idea is one of many nuggets in a terrific book that I recommend to anyone interested in mentoring or making a difference with young people. Teachers, sailing school and junior program directors would be well served to read How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, by Paul Tough. Get it here:

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