Kids become what they do

April 23, 2013 § 2 Comments

If you’ve participated in a Saving Sailing town-call, you’ll recall talking about how sailing (and other important outdoor experiences) suffer under the media avalanche that buries most kids. Of course, the problem transcends sailing. Schools, family and neighborhoods have been crushed too.

I’ve started a new blog called FamilyNeighborhoodSchool.com to study the problem and discuss solutions. I hope you’ll follow it too.

 – Nicholas Hayes, Author of Saving Sailing

Have you ever witnessed a kid fast forward through the previews on a rented DVD, or call out Britney Spears swigging a Pepsi as a ploy to get you to consume more corn syrup? Not all kids know advertising to be propaganda, but taking the lead from an adult, some do. Credit the young mind with the ability to grasp symbols and metaphor and see through distortion or exaggeration. When abstract thinking develops, bright colors and catchy music might still attract attention, but a kid can understand that it might be toward something being sold. Kids are smart.

To be clear, advertising messages do shape public opinion, especially those of the impressionable or the emotional. But like emotions, messages and public opinion are fleeting; they are just words, pictures, and fads that fade or shift with time. The impressionable grow up. The emotional find new cares.

Measured in durability over years, messages pale in comparison with experiences in defining who we are, what we believe, and how we act throughout our lives.

Kids don’t become what they see on TV or the Internet. They become what they do. Read more.

Kids and video games

#Facebooksailing

February 28, 2013 § Leave a comment

Facebook Sailing

Apparently, I’ve ruffled more feathers by suggesting that social media isn’t the solution. What do you think? Read #Facebooksailing in this month’s Spinsheet Magazine.

saving hawaiian style | Sailing Anarchy

February 15, 2013 § 1 Comment

SA is reporting on “Saving Sailing” in Hawaii, happening right now…

Every year Hawaii Yacht Club and Waikiki Yacht Club, and their sailing directors Scott Melander and Guy Fleming make available their boats, and their yacht club facilities to high school kids on Oahu, and have an amazing season with two divisions of Varsity Sailing, and JV. Hundreds of kids are introduced to the sport, or continue their Junior development. Talk about “Saving Sailing”…these guys live it every day. Photo: Guy Fleming, Waikiki Yacht Club.

saving-11

Read more: saving hawaiian style | Sailing Anarchy.

Pop-up sailing?

February 2, 2013 § Leave a comment

Nick,
Hi, my name is R P. I heard about your book Saving Sailing on Sailing Anarchy. I am about 100 pages into it and enjoying it quite a bit so far. In your book, you mention a French-designed boat on page 94 that sounds like the perfect boat for my family in our current situation. Could you tell me the make or model of the boat you are talking about? Thanks for any help you can offer.
R

——-
Hi R,

I believe it was/is called the Kaïdoz. Not sure of it is still in production. Can’t say it was beautiful, but it seemed innovative.
Kaïdoz
Thanks for your message.
Nick

In yer face, Rolex

January 9, 2013 § 1 Comment

In yer face, Rolex

Seen first on SailingAnarchy.com.

Energy drink marketers are way smarter than I. After all, in the last 10 years they’ve invented new and novel ways to get folks to pay $7 billion more for caffeine. It’s the equivalent of repositioning the hot-dog as la cuisine gastronomique. Genius.

But this time, I think they’re really on to something. They might even Save Sailing!

Look around. Sailing is changing. It’s getting faster and way more fun for the pros. So the pros need helmets. And helmets need logos. Any savvy marketer will tell you those logos should reflect the target audience’s grandest aspirations. For example, everyone knows that NFL fans prefer tasteless beer and pizza.

What an honor it is for sailors to have caught the attention of said brilliant energy drink marketers, even in our advanced age. We’re no longer lowly connoisseurs of platinum timepieces and French champagne. No, thankfully, we sailors have just been promoted to the gas station drink cooler.

It’s a new day for sailing. Shed the pretension. Blue blood be damned. Let’s get real about our awesome sport. It’s extreme. It’s in yer face. It’s for guys with huge trucks.

Popeye, meet Viagra.

—–

Update (01/16/2013): Here is what the Anarchists had to say. My favorite comment:

Skoal Bandit KWRW ?

Hustling BICs vs. Busted Stuff

July 15, 2012 § Leave a comment

Another from C. Crain's series of oil paintings, called "Here Come the Optis"

Another from C. Crain’s series of oil paintings, called “Here Come the Optis” (Click to zoom)

This string probably deserves its own post. How ’bout we call it “Hustling BICs vs. Busted Stuff.”

It all started here: https://savingsailing.com/2012/07/12/opti-haters/

Capt’n Ron on July 13, 2012 at 8:35 pm:

I’ve been in the sail training business for 20 years and although I don’t classify myself as an Opti hater, I do strongly believe that there are more modern day platforms and more fun boats for kids to experience their first sail(s) on.

For example, if I were to take 25 kids and take them for their first sail on an Opti and take those same kids for a sail on an Open followed by a vote on their
preference of boat, the score would be 25-0 in favor of the Open Bic. Comments from the kids would be that the Open Bic is funner, faster, easier, cooler, more comfortable, not to mention – no bailing required!

It’s not that kids can’t learn to sail in an Opti, it’s about making their first experience the best possible and keeping them excited so that they keep coming back.

Why do we have kids learning on a 50 year old platform? Just imagine if you decided to have your kids learn downhill skiing on a pair of 1960 vintage skis. There are many more examples of other sports that have adapted and taken advantage of technology to make it easier and more fun for kids to learn on.

My kids first learned how to sail on an Opti, but once exposed to the O’pen BIC, they never went back.

If we are to get the masses (next generation) excited about sailing and keep them excited, especially given the choices that kids have today, then we’ll have to move away from teaching kids based on a design from 1947. It really is time to move on.

Reply ↓

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Sailing Country

June 15, 2012 § 1 Comment

This from one of my sailing heroes, Marc Fortune in Nashville, who assembled a top-notch team and broke new ground in sailing advocacy over the winter. It’s starting paying off for kids and families in and around the area.

Now that sailing season has returned for my fellow cheese heads, I am delighted to report that our Regional Summit has fired up the deckhands. Our sailing camp is as popular as ever and we may be adding a remote program to a community 50 miles south of Nashville. “It’s what Nick talked about at the Summit,” the promoter told me.  So, my friend, you are indeed making this a better world – one sailor at a time.

Thanks for all you do for our sport, for what you helped us with in Nashville.

The big bonus: I learned that I have been harboring a secret love of country music. Look up Don Schlitz when you have a moment.

Here are a couple of highlights.

Sailing at the Parthenon

How to find sailing in Nashville: Start at the Parthenon

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